RECOMMENDED RESOURCES


Native Torrey Pine tree

San Elijo Lagoon Conservancy recommends the following sources for common questions about living near wetlands, gardening, and more.

In addition, please visit the News/Publications site for Conservancy annual reports, membership newsletters, trail guides, and videos.

California native plants

California Native Plant Society

California Native Plant Society (SD Chapter)

Native plant nurseries and sources

California Native Nurseries List

Las Pilitas Nursery, Escondido

Moosa Creek Nursery, Valley Center

Tree of Life

Information on invasive plants

California Invasive Plant Council: Plant profiles, field courses, brochures etc.

How to attract wildlife to your garden

Creating bird & butterfly friendly gardens: National Wildlife Federation guides

California Friendly Garden Guide

California Native Plant Society

Horses

Equestrian-Related Water Quality Best Management Practices (PDF)

Regional Conservation Resource Links

Carlsbad Watershed Network

County of San Diego Department of Parks and Recreation

San Diego Conservation Resources Network

State of California Department of Fish and Game

The Escondido Creek Conservancy (TECC)

Friends of Daley Ranch

Protected Wetlands and Coastal Reserves in San Diego County

Top 100 Forestry Resources

EnvironmentalScience.org (careers)

Fire Science Online (careers)

 

SAN ELIJO LAGOON CONSERVANCY
 
WATER CONSERVATION 101
 
A prolonged drought tests the resilience of our native plants, naturally designed to withstand long periods of insignificant rainfall. We hope you find this resource of water conservation tips to help us all conserve our region's valuable water resources.

CHECK FOR HOME WATER LEAKS

  • Check your water meter and record the current amount used. Wait two hours and do not use any water during this time. Check the meter again after two hours and see if water meter reads the same, or higher. If higher, you have a leak. Some culprits are leaky faucets, toilets, and outside watering pipes. A leaky faucet can waste up to 20 gallons a day. Next step is to isolate the leak.

CONSERVE TAP WATER

  • It is easy to forget to turn off the water while brushing teeth or washing dishes. But turning off the water even for a couple seconds while you are not using it can save you money and water.

INSTALL WATER-SAVING SHOWER HEADS AND AERATORS

  • Low-flow shower heads will use less than 2.5 gallons of water per minute.
  • An aerator or similar device can be placed on most faucets and is an inexpensive way to decrease everyday water usage.

ENJOY SHORTER SHOWERS

  • A four-minute shower uses approximately 20-40 gallons of water.

KEEP A WATER WISE GARDEN AND YARD

  • If possible, try to grow native, drought tolerant plants that do not require a lot of water and maintenance.
  • Place a layer of mulch around trees and plants to lock in moisture and slow soil drying.
  • Water during early and late parts of the day. This will decrease evapotranspiration and allow the plants to soak up the most water.

WASH CARS IN ESTABLISHED PLACES

  • Washing your auto at home can use 150 gallons of water or more per washing, especially if you do not use a valve shut-off and leave the hose running. Patronizing a car wash that either recycles water on site or sends the used water (grey water) to a treatment plant is often the most water efficient way to wash a vehicle.

Learn more about how to be a steward of change and help preserve our finite water resources:

Information compiled by Winter 2014 Habitat Management Program Interns.